North Carolina's Lt. Gov. Robinson goes nuclear on 'insane' and 'insulting' leftist narrative on voter suppression

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The lieutenant governor of North Carolina, the first black man to hold that office, excoriated arguments from Democrats that compare voter integrity measures such as the new law passed in Georgia to racist voter suppression laws of the Jim Crow south.

On Thursday, Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson (R) testified at a hearing in the House of Representatives titled, “Oversight of the Voting Rights Act: The Evolving Landscape of Voting Discrimination.” In his opening remarks, he said it was “insane” and “insulting” for anyone to compare the voter ID laws passed in Georgia and other states to Jim Crow laws that were used to tyrannize black Americans and keep them from voting.

“My people were put in the belly of ships, bound by chains, and endured the middle passage. My people were whipped, beaten, and sold as property. In Reconstruction and throughout Jim Crow, black people were intimidated, harassed, and even killed to keep them from having a voice in government,” Robinson told House lawmakers. “Symbols like chains, nooses, and burnt crosses are not just symbols of death, they are symbols of forced and coerced silence.

“The sacrifices of our ancestors so I could have the opportunity to become the first black lieutenant governor of my state, to see a black man sit in the White House, and for millions of us to be leaders in business, athletics, and culture is incredible,” he continued.

Turning to the Georgia law, which Democrats have accused of implementing “Jim Crow in 2021” by suppressing the minority vote, Robinson demanded to know how black voices were being silenced or kept out of the political process.

“How? By fear of a noose or chains? To be fired from work? To be ostracized by their communities? No. A free ID to vote. Let me say that again, a free ID to vote,” he said.

He continued:

How absolutely preposterous. Am I to believe that black Americans who have overcome the atrocities of slavery, who were victorious in the civil rights movement, and who now sit in the highest levels of government cannot figure out how to get a