I left a life I loved in NYC and moved to a tiny town in rural Vermont during the pandemic. I miss takeout and trash pickup, but overall I'm thrilled with the decision.

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My dog in front of our barn during the snowy winter months.

Jessica Frisco is a healthcare director who moved from NYC to rural Vermont during the pandemic. She and her fiancé quickly grew fond of their new small town, despite their worries about the change. They enjoy more outdoor activities, save on expenses and groceries, and are easily making new friends. See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Like millions of New Yorkers who justify their sky-high rents with the opportunity to live out their dreams, I thought NYC was the most incredible place in the world. After seven years in the city, I was thriving with strong friendships, a great job, a beautiful apartment in Williamsburg, and a packed schedule full of activism, exciting nights around town, and taking care of my dog.

At 28 years old, being a New Yorker felt like a huge part of my identity, and even during the pandemic, I had a difficult time imagining ever leaving.

But when I stumbled on my dream house in rural southern Vermont, I started imagining the crazy alternative of a life elsewhere. Could anything compare to the buzzing energy of NYC? Though I had always dreamed of owning my own home, I was deeply anxious about the thought of leaving behind my friends, the political causes and networks I had dedicated so much energy to, and the infinite opportunities of the city. NYC was stimulating, challenging, and full of interesting people.

But believe it or not, so is my new life in Dummerston, Vermont.

Here’s what it’s like to move from the big city to a tiny, rural hamlet – the main things I was worried about, and how they turned out.

Making the leap to Dummerston Jessica Frisco in front a cascading waterfall near her home in Dummerston, Vermont.

I traded in the “rustic chic” aesthetic ubiquitous across Williamsburg (farmhouse decor, hipster lumberjacks) for the real thing. The