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Eliza Relman/Business Insider Thousands of protesters marched through Washington, DC, on Saturday, demanding justice in the wake of George Floyd's killing in police custody on March 25. Similar demonstrations have broken out in dozens of cities across the country amid nearly two weeks of nationwide civil unrest. Protesters told Insider they were there to show support for the black community and denounce police brutality. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Washingtonians fanned our across the nation's capital to protest on Saturday, taking over landmarks like the Lincoln Memorial and surrounding the White House as police blocked most of the major roads leading into downtown. Demonstrations have broken out in dozens of cities across the country in the wake of the death of George Floyd, who was killed after a Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes. As hundreds of marchers streamed toward the Capitol, helpers handed out water bottles as the temperature climbed towards 90 degrees. As the sun bore down, dozens of protesters stood on the steps of a Senate office building named for the Georgia segregationist Richard Russell, holding signs aloft that declared that "Black Lives Matter" and demanding justice - now. A few feet away, thousands of masked protesters marched down Constitution Avenue in the direction of the National Mall. Here's how the protests unfolded in Washington, DC, throughout Saturday: Protesters marched peacefully down the newly renamed Black Lives Matter plaza in front of the White House, chanting slogans like, "No justice, no peace," "Black Lives Matter," and, "Whose streets? Our streets." Kayla Epstein/Business Insider Eliza Relman/Business Insider Demonstrators said they wanted to see extensive police reform in the wake of Floyd's death — some advocated for defunding police departments. Eliza Relman/Business Insider Chris Moore, a 26-year-old Maryland resident, said he hoped that the protests would result in concrete police reforms. "I know people just throw out defunding the police," he said, "but if we defund want to make sure that those funds that are taken away go into community projects. More after school programs," he said. Eliza Relman/Business Insider Many of the protesters have been attending demonstrations all week — 50-year-old Amos Tevelow said he had attended DC protests for six or seven days straight. "It's a very hopeful moment," he said. "You start with ending police brutality and you work your way up the chain from there." Eliza Relman/Business Insider A number of frontline healthcare workers and medical students also showed up to protest — they wore scrubs and face masks and carried signs saying, "White coats for black lives." Kayla Epstein/Business Insider Though police and National Guard troops had a heavy presence in previous protests, leading to several violent clashes with protesters earlier in the week, they weren't as visible on Saturday. Eliza Relman/Business Insider
OTTAWA, ON, June 6, 2020 /CNW/ - Summary Product: Certain hand sanitizers made with industrial-grade ethanol Issue: Health Canada is advising Canadians that certain hand sanitizers are being recalled from the market because they contain industrial-grade ethanol that has not been authorized for use in hand sanitizers in Canada.What to do: Stop using these products. Consult your healthcare professional if you have used any of these products and have health concerns. Report any health product adverse events or complaints to Health Canada. See the additional information on buying health products safely in the links below. IssueHealth Canada is advising Canadians that certain hand sanitizers are being recalled from the market because they contain industrial-grade ethanol that has not been authorized for use in hand sanitizers in Canada. Industrial-grade ethanol contains impurities that are not found in the type of ethanol approved for use in manufacturing hand sanitizers, such as technical-grade, food-grade or pharmaceutical-grade ethanol. In addition, chemicals that may not be approved for use in hand sanitizers are added to industrial-grade ethanol. Frequent use of these products may result in dry skin, causing irritation or cracking. Since industrial-grade ethanol has not been approved for use in hand sanitizers in Canada, the Department has not reviewed it for safety or efficacy. A list of affected products can be found below. Health Canada will update this list if it becomes aware of other affected products, so that Canadians can easily identify ones they may have purchased and take appropriate action. Canadians are encouraged to consult the list regularly for updates. What you should do Stop using the products listed below. Please follow municipal or regional guidelines on how to dispose of chemicals and other hazardous waste. You may also return the product to your local pharmacy for proper disposal. Consult your healthcare professional if you have used these products and have health concerns. To help limit the spread of COVID-19, wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizers if soap and water are not available. Use hand sanitizers that have been authorized for sale in Canada. Hand sanitizers that have been authorized will display either a Natural Product Number (NPN) or Drug Identification Number (DIN) on the product label. These products can be found on the list of hand sanitizers that meet Health Canada's requirements. Consult the list of hand sanitizers authorized or registered in other jurisdiction that may not display an NPN or DIN but have been accepted for use in Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic. This list of accepted products can be found here. Report any health product adverse events or complaints to Health Canada. What Health Canada is doing? Health Canada has directed companies to stop the sale of these products and is monitoring the effectiveness of the recalls. If Health Canada identifies additional products or manufacturers using ethanol that does not meet Health Canada requirements, the Department will take appropriate action and inform Canadians, including updating this list. Affected products Product Recalling Company NPN or DIN Lot numbers Expiry Date Date Added Eltraderm Hand Sanitizer - 70 % Ethyl Alcohol Eltraderm Limited 80098540 0217 April 2022 June 6, 2020 Hand Sanitizer Contract Packaging Distributions Inc. 80098453 8613026 8613042 8613048 8613055 8613057 8613058 8613061 8613064 8613066 April 2022 June 6, 2020 Gel 700 Hand Sanitizer Nature's Own Cosmetic Company Inc. 80100166 8613026 8613042 8613048 8613055 8613057 8613058 8613061 8613064 8613066 May 2022 June 6, 2020 Sanilabs Hand Sanitizer 70% Ethanol Sanilabs Inc. 80098769 6069 April 20, 2022 June 6, 2020 6075 April 28, 2022 Walker Emulsions Hand Sanitizer Walker Emulsions Ltd. 80098678 209638 Not printed on the label June 6, 2020 Hand Sanitizer Désinfectant pour les mains   Walker Emulsions Ltd. 80100040 210061 Not printed on the label June 6, 2020 For more information Natural Health Products Licensed Natural Health Product Database Hard surface disinfectants and hand sanitizers (COVID-19) Health Canada is temporarily authorizing the use of technical-grade ethanol in hand sanitizer products Technical Grade Ethanol Risk Assessment Summary Report Health Canada's decision on technical-grade ethanol for the manufacture of hand sanitizers: Notice to industry   SOURCE Health Canada
SEOUL, South Korea, June 6, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- How should universities evolve and innovate as the world enters a new phase with the fourth industrial revolution, accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic? World's Universities with Real Impact (WURI) invites educators, researchers, data scientists, and professionals of diverse fields to engage in answering this complex question at a virtual conference to be held on June 11, 3 pm Central European Summer Time (CEST) and 10 pm Korea Standard Time (KST). WURI is a new university ranking system which was announced to be developed last year at the 2nd Hanseatic League of Universities (HLU) Conference held at Incheon National University, South Korea, to overcome the limitations of existing methods of evaluating and ranking universities. According to WURI, the existing university rankings heavily weigh on research performance, measured by the number of research papers, and traditional methods of knowledge-transfer. Therefore, they do not properly assess agile and innovative programs of universities in the current era of change. The need for a new approach to evaluate the institutions of higher education has long been voiced by the society. Particularly with the advent of the 4th industrial revolution that shifted our perspectives on human talent and management, educators and institutions have been gearing efforts to change school programs and curricula to meet the demands of the corporate world and society. Minerva Schools is a good example. Currently, without having any classrooms in seven different countries they operate in, Minerva Schools has dorms for the students to dwell in while focusing on education for business ventures and industry competitiveness. The existing rankings provide important insight into the research efforts of universities; however, they inadequately represent the overall social impact by the universities as effective educational institutions. To meet this need, WURI was developed as an alternative system for extant university rankings, which examines the innovative programs of universities. WURI ranking has three core evaluation categories and a new one which is added each year. For 2020 ranking, the four categories WURI highlights are as follows: Industrial applications, rather than the traditional ways of counting research papers and lecture-type teaching. Value-creating startups and entrepreneurship, rather than a traditional focus on the number of jobs filled. Social responsibility, ethics, and integrity, rather than a focus on knowledge and skills just for material success. Student mobility and openness for exchange and collaboration between schools and across national borders, rather than an independent yet closed system. Based on expert surveys from the university presidents, chancellors, and representatives, the WURI evaluation system adopted the Text Informational Analysis (TIA) for the qualitative aspects of analysis. In addition, the data collected by WURI to generate the rankings will be shared on Kaggle, the global platform for data sharing and prediction model development, in order to open the data on university performance to the public and facilitate participation of data scientists around the world in refining the system. This is an exciting development that promotes universities to innovate the way they foster human capital for the changing world and utilize their resources most efficiently and meaningfully. The inaugural virtual conference on June 11 will introduce the new ranking system and provide an outlook on the challenges and opportunities for higher education institutions. This will be a valuable chance to learn about the innovative practices of universities that preceding rankings did not reflect and to participate in discussion with experts and professionals around the world on universities' role in the future. The event is organized by four global institutions: Hanseatic League of Universities (HLU) Institute for Policy and Strategy on National Competitiveness (IPSNC) United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) Taylor Institute (TI) of Franklin University in Switzerland (FUS) To register, please click this link: https://bitly.kr/59TWCBeJMr Related Imagesa-new-ranking-for-innovative.jpg A New Ranking for Innovative UniversitiesWorld Universities with Real Impact (WURI) for 2020 Related Linkshttps://www.wuri.world/index.php/wuri View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/south-koreas-research-institute-ipsnc-shares-kaggle-data-and-releases-a-new-ranking-for-innovative-universities-world-universities-with-real-impact-wuri-for-2020-301071661.html SOURCE IPSNC
Los Algodones, Baja California, Mexico, June 6, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ -- One of the largest and most prestigious dental clinics in Mexico, Sani Dental Group, is the first and only dental group in the region with the COVID-19 Trust Shield Certificate from Dental Departures. The COVID-19 Trust Shield Certificate truly demonstrates a remarkable accomplishment for Sani Dental Group, as a result of adapting their operations to ensure the highest standards possible for patients, which include several implemented guidelines that will become the new standard of care. Mexico is the world's favorite dental tourism destination among hundreds of thousands of patients looking for top quality procedures at the best prices. Now, Sani Dental Group, with this accreditation from such a reputable organization like Dental Departures, reaffirms their pledge for continuing to address many patient's dental needs putting their health and safety first. About Sani Dental Group With more than 30 years of experience, Sani Dental Group, has three clinics in two different locations. Two clinics in Los Algodones, a quiet little town completely devoted to dental tourists, and their newest clinic in the exclusive area of Playacar at the Riviera Maya. Throughout the years, Sani Dental Group has become well known in the industry for helping patients achieve a better quality of life while having the best dental experience. With more than 40 qualified dentists and different specialties including oral and maxillofacial surgery, implantology, periodontics, and endodontics, they're ready to provide optimal dental care.   SOURCE Sani Dental Group
Los Algodones, Baja California, Mexico, June 6, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ -- One of the largest and most prestigious dental clinics in Mexico, Sani Dental Group, is the first and only dental group in the region with the COVID-19 Trust Shield Certificate from Dental Departures. The COVID-19 Trust Shield Certificate truly demonstrates a remarkable accomplishment for Sani Dental Group, as a result of adapting their operations to ensure the highest standards possible for patients, which include several implemented guidelines that will become the new standard of care. Mexico is the world's favorite dental tourism destination among hundreds of thousands of patients looking for top quality procedures at the best prices. Now, Sani Dental Group, with this accreditation from such a reputable organization like Dental Departures, reaffirms their pledge for continuing to address many patient's dental needs putting their health and safety first. About Sani Dental Group With more than 30 years of experience, Sani Dental Group, has three clinics in two different locations. Two clinics in Los Algodones, a quiet little town completely devoted to dental tourists, and their newest clinic in the exclusive area of Playacar at the Riviera Maya. Throughout the years, Sani Dental Group has become well known in the industry for helping patients achieve a better quality of life while having the best dental experience. With more than 40 qualified dentists and different specialties including oral and maxillofacial surgery, implantology, periodontics, and endodontics, they're ready to provide optimal dental care.   SOURCE Sani Dental Group
An Indian drug giant, little-known outside the vaccine world, has agreed to make and distribute a billion doses of a yet-to-be approved coronavirus vaccine—a move aimed at providing pandemic protection to the world’s poorest.
An Indian drug giant, little-known outside the vaccine world, has agreed to make and distribute a billion doses of a yet-to-be approved coronavirus vaccine—a move aimed at providing pandemic protection to the world’s poorest.
LONDON (REUTERS) - Reclusive British street artist Banksy published a new artwork online on Saturday (June 6) which depicts the United States flag being set alight by a candle that forms part of a memorial to an anonymous, black, silhouetted figure. The artwork appeared as thousands of people gathered in London and other cities around the world to protest the May 25 killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, where a white police officer detaining him knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes. "People of colour are being failed by the system. The white system," Banksy wrote in a short statement that accompanied the image on the social media platform Instagram. Banksy likened racism to a broken pipe flooding a downstairs apartment, and said the downstairs occupants would be entitled to break into the apartment upstairs to fix the problem. "This is a white problem. And if white people don't fix it, someone will have to come upstairs and kick the door in," Banksy wrote alongside the image. Banksy frequently chooses topical themes for his artworks, which are normally stencilled on walls. Last month, he showed a young boy choosing a nurse as the superhero he wants to play with over Batman and Spiderman, in a new artwork to encapsulate the gratitude Britons have felt towards the country's National Health Service during the coronavirus crisis.
REUTERS/Leah Millis/File Photo Chief Medaria Arradondo, who leads the Minneapolis police department and is the officer responsible for the death of George Floyd, once sued the city and the department, alleging racial discrimination.  As the city's first black police chief, Arradondo has attempted to introduce meaningful reform and lessen excessive force — but he's met with resistance from the rank-and-file police union and its bombastic leader, Bob Kroll.  Criminal justice experts say police unions impede meaningful reform in Minneapolis and other city police departments.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. United States District Court, District of Minnesota, Fourth Division In 2007, a group of five black police officers, each with more than a dozen years on the job, sued Minneapolis' police department for racial discrimination. Officer Medaria Arradondo and his colleagues stated in the suit that they had faced retaliation since joining the department, like in 1992, when they received a letter from interoffice mail signed with "KKK." Among other things, the black cops' suit claimed that white officer Bob Kroll, who joined the police force the same year as Arradondo, called then-US Congressman Keith Ellison, who is a black Muslim, a "terrorist." But thirteen years later, Kroll and Arradondo are at odds again over racism. Arradondo now serves as Minneapolis' police chief, whose officer was shown killing George Floyd in a now-notorious video that sparked a nationwide uprising. And Kroll is the head of the local police union that has defended the officers involved in Floyd's death. (Keith Ellison, who Kroll is said to have slandered, is now Minnesota's Attorney General, currently bringing charges against Arradondo's officers and Kroll's union members.) Jerry Holt/Star Tribune via Getty Images Arradondo and Kroll represent two sides of a police force grappling with decades of brutal episodes and just as many years of strained relations with black residents.  Their ongoing headbutting also reveals an exceptional aspect of the labor movement in the US.  Progressives laud unions as the voice of the America's increasingly black and brown working class. But criminal justice experts told Business Insider that police unions protect aggressive cops, buttressing the underlying system of police brutality in the US. This MPD story is a case study in how a city's police union leader can disregard the actions of a chief that are designed to crack down on bad cops.  Both the union and MPD declined to comment. John Minchillo/AP Minneapolis police chiefs have been pushing for reform — but the union won't let it happen Though Arradondo called out Kroll's bad behavior in his lawsuit years ago, the union leader has generally spoken well of his chief: "He's the opposite of a narcissist," Kroll told the Star Tribune. "This is truly about advancing this department." Still, the two have sparred over key police reform policies. In 2014, when Arradondo was serving as chief of staff to former Police Chief Janée Harteau, he helped introduce a police body camera policy to hold bad cops accountable. Many city departments began using body cameras around 2014, after the police killings of Michael Brown and Eric Garner.  Kroll initially supported body cameras, telling MinnPost his only objection was if civilians disagreed with being taped at protests or disturbances. But he changed course in 2017, after a police officer shot and killed a white Australian woman in an alley; the officer's body camera was turned off at the time of the shooting. Kroll said the officers at the scene "were in compliance with existing body camera policy." After the killing, Arradondo changed the body camera policy to ensure they stayed turned on. "There are some officers, quite frankly, that are not using them nearly enough," he told the New York Times. The two sparred again in 2019, after Arradondo moved to bar police from wearing their uniforms to political rallies ahead of a scheduled visit from President Trump. Kroll had previously been photographed in full uniform standing at a rally for Republican representative Erik Paulsen. The US Hatch Act limits the political activity of federal employees as well as certain state-level employees that work in connection with federal programs, like Kroll. Kroll called Arradondo's decision "politically motivated." Kroll said of police union's members that "We're going to be there in full force, in T-shirts, letting people know that off-duty officers do have support for our president." The disagreements between the two have now gone national. Arradondo swiftly fired the four officers involved in George Floyd's arrest, and suggested that the officers who watched Floyd struggling to breathe should have intervened.  "Mr. Floyd died in our hands and so I see that as being complicit," Arradondo told CNN's Sara Sidner. "Silence and inaction, you're complicit." Kroll disagreed. In a letter addressed to union members, Kroll said the officers were "scapegoats" and had been fired "without due process." "What has been very evident throughout this process is you have lacked support from the top," Kroll told members. "This terrorist movement that is currently occuring was a long time build up which dates back years."  ayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images Kroll was an obstacle to the chief before Arradondo, too Bob Kroll got his start in the Minneapolis police department in 1989. The son of a union man, Kroll joined the Minneapolis Police Federation in 1996.  The Star Tribune reports that during his tenure, Kroll has amassed at least 20 internal-affairs complaints against him, some for aggressive behavior. In one federal lawsuit, plaintiffs said Kroll beat, choked, and kicked a 15-year-old biracial boy in the groin while spewing racial slurs, the Pioneer Press reported. The court cleared Kroll of wrongdoing. Another suit from 2007 claimed Kroll and a group of officers used excessive force on an elderly couple during a SWAT team search. As union chief, Kroll has protected other aggressive officers in his ranks. The union leader stood up for officer Steven Andersen, who was fired for killing a 19-year-old Hmong teenager during a foot chase. After the police department reinstated Andersen, Kroll said he was "very happy" because Andersen was "born to be a cop," the Pioneer Press reported. Kroll later defended the two officers involved in the 2016 killing of Jamar Clark, a 24-year-old black man who witnesses said had been handcuffed, calling their actions "justified."  After taking his role as union head in 2015, Kroll frequently sparred with then-Police Chief Janeé Harteau, who between 2012 and 2017 was the first female and first openly gay police chief in Minneapolis history, before getting ousted from her post following a police killing. Harteau was, however, able to enact a "sanctity of life" policy after the Clark shooting, which was the policy cited by Arradondo in firing the officers involved in Floyd's death.  The Philando Castile shooting in 2016, which occurred outside of Minneapolis, in Falcon Heights, became a Kroll story when he said he commended four off-duty officers walking out of their security duties at a Minnesota Lynx WNBA game. Minneapolis' mayor at the time, Betsy Hodges, said Kroll's words were "jackass remarks" that didn't reflect the views of the city or the MPD.  Kroll also publicly pushed back on policy changes Harteau introduced to reduce the use of force by police. He said her initiatives, which included avoiding potentially deadly confrontation, may lessen public trust in police and lead to more crime. In a leaked email, City Pages reported that Harteau told Kroll not to wear his uniform while speaking as the labor union representative. "This letter is a reminder as well as a direct order that you wear your MPD uniform only for MPD-sanctioned purposes," she wrote in 2016. "MPD-sanctioned purposes' does not include speaking in your capacity as a labor union representative." After Harteau departed, Kroll continued to oppose reform measures, including an initiative by Mayor Jacob Frey to ban "warrior-style" training for officers. Jerry Holt/Star Tribune via Getty Images Unlike Minneapolis' union leader, the city's police chief built his reputation on improving community relations When Arradondo succeeded Harteau as chief in 2017, he was the first black person to head the Minneapolis Police Department in its 150-year history, the Star Tribune reported. He has continued to stress that he hoped to improve race relations at his position — but has met with resistance from the rank and file. Arradondo served different supervisory positions before being promoted to oversee the internal affairs unit, which oversees misconduct complaints, in 2013, and then serving as Harteau's chief of staff in 2014. He vowed to improve police relationships within the community. "For us to advance any of our policies or measures which are really aimed at increasing public safety of our city, I think all of those are important key players," Arradondo said of civilians, public officials, and the department's rank-and-file. "They all have to be at the same table, and they all have to hear the same messaging," he told Minnesota Public Radio. "They all, also, have to be listened to. That's where I see my role." Arradondo had climbed the ranks after settling his racial discrimination case against the department in 2009, coming away with $187,000. (The plaintiffs collectively reached a settlement of $740,000.) When he brought the suit along with other black officers, Arradondo was already a 20-year veteran of the MPD. Among other things, the lawsuit asserted that Kroll used to wear a motorcycle jacket with a "White Power" badge sewn onto it. Kroll is part of the City Heat motorcycle club for off-duty police officers, which has been cited by the Anti-Defamation League for including members that display white power symbols.  Police unions have something rare in American organized labor: power over management  In the private sector, union membership has declined by 15% over the last two decades. But in the public sector, union membership has remained strong due to a lack of competition, according to Dan DiSalvo of the Manhattan Institute. Since there is just one public police unit for a given jurisdiction, police management can't easily fire and replace swaths of fractious cops like private firms can. Sam Walker, emeritus professor of criminal justice at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, said police unions largely formed in the 1950s and 1960s for the purpose of collectively bargaining for pensions and healthcare. Before unions, police hiring was often corrupt, involving bribes and political kickbacks.  But in addition to advocating for higher wages, unions also sought to protect job security by limiting disciplinary transparency. Reuters examined 82 police union contracts across the US and found nearly half allow officers to access complaints before being interrogated. A majority of them call to erase disciplinary records to make it harder to fire officers with bad records.  "I think there's a consensus among my peers that police unions and their contracts are to police the major obstacle to accountability," Walker said.  In Minneapolis, Reuters found that nine out of every 10 accusations of misconduct from city police officers were resolved without punishment. Of the 3,000 complaints regarding police in the last eight years, just five resulted in termination. African-Americans account for 20% of Minneapolis' population but for more than 60% of the victims in police shootings, according to an analysis from The New York Times. The city's own data shows that its police officers use force against blacks seven times more than they do against whites. Kroll admits he is no stranger to shooting. In a podcast interview this past April, Kroll said he has been involved in "three shootings" himself, The Intercept reported.  In a potential sign of the growing frustration with police unions' suppression of meaningful reform, protesters after George Floyd's death burned the headquarters of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) in Washington, DC. AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka told reporters he would not disengage with police unions. "The short answer is not to disengage and just condemn," he said. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Brooklyn College sociologist Alex Vitale, author of "The End of Policing" and former vice president of a faculty union, told Business Insider that the labor movement should limit police unions and expose their "terrible politics." Vitale said the broader labor movement has lost its broader mission to aid social justice, which allowed AFL-CIO to cozy up with police unions.  "One of the functions historically of police has been the direct suppression of workers' movements and unionization efforts," Vitale told Business Insider. "Having them be part of our labor movement seems counter-productive." During his election campaign, current Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey acknowledged the role the police union played in protecting members from getting disciplined for aggressive behavior. "They're looking at their job as often unions do: Let's protect our officers from getting terminated," Frey said during a 2017 meeting on police reform. "I believe that the role is broader than that." Kroll, meanwhile, has tied good police-work with accumulating civilian complaints. "Officers that have thick complaint sleeves are also highly decorated," Kroll told the Pioneer Press in 2016. "Cops that are doing nothing are cheating the taxpayers. And I've always prided myself in being a hard-working cop, and my union work is no different." And the department led by Medaria Arradondo, the one he sued more than a decade ago for racial discrimination? Last summer, his department had to fire two officers over a furor that hit the previous winter. What Mayor Frey described as a "racist display" had surfaced on Facebook around the holiday season: a photo of a Christmas tree at the department's fourth precinct, some 20 minutes from what would become the site of George Floyd's killing, decorated with a can of Steel Reserve malt liquor, a pack of Newport cigarettes, and a cup from Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen.    The police union appealed. 
Restaurants, retailers and even Amherst College are looking to move activity outside to allay infection fears, and that has boosted demand for temporary structures.
Restaurants, retailers and even Amherst College are looking to move activity outside to allay infection fears, and that has boosted demand for temporary structures.
Restaurants, retailers and even Amherst College are looking to move activity outside to allay infection fears, and that has boosted demand for temporary structures.