21 black leaders call out ‘despicable smear campaign’ against Georgia voting law

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Nearly two dozen civil rights leaders and black conservatives have stepped up to defend Georgia’s much-maligned voting law against inaccurate criticisms that the new law is racist and akin to “Jim Crow in the 21st century,” the Daily Signal reported.

What are the details?

In a letter sent to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, several prominent black leaders — including Heritage Foundation President Kay James and former Ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Commission Ken Blackwell — blasted what they called a “despicable smear campaign” against the law.

“It has become clear that even well-intentioned critics of the law simply have no idea what the law is,” the letter stated in reference to repeated lies about the law peddled by a litany of Democratic political figures, including President Joe Biden.

Last month, Biden earned “Four Pinocchios” from Washington Post fact-checker Glenn Kessler over his repeated claims that the law “ends voting hours early so working people can’t cast their vote after their shift is over.” The president also called the law racist, saying it “makes Jim Crow look like Jim Eagle.”

“It is clear they have no idea how favorably Georgia’s new law compares with most other states — including President Biden’s home state of Delaware,” the letter went on. “And it is clear they have no idea that a majority of Black voters across the country support the key provision under attack by critics — the simple requirement that voters be able to identify themselves when voting.”

The civil rights leaders also took a deliberate shot at Major League Baseball and Atlanta-based Delta Air Lines for their protests of the reforms, saying, “This is the same simple requirement needed to pick up baseball tickets or board a plane — activities hardly as important as voting.”

Last month, the MLB opted to move its annual All-Star game out of Georgia in protest over the new law. Delta Air Lines CEO Ed Bastian protested as well, wrongly claiming the law “could make it harder for many